• Our team at CHK America put  together these service information panels for Metroway BRT.  Operated by WMATA, Metroway is Virginia’s first dedicated busway linking Alexandria, Potomac Yard development and Crystal city. 
It was a quick turnaround. The station panels include line map, a map of the surrounding area, a schedule of frequency, and other information such as fares and connecting bus routes.
Photo by Oran Viriyincy. Designed at CHK America
  • Our team at CHK America put  together these service information panels for Metroway BRT.  Operated by WMATA, Metroway is Virginia’s first dedicated busway linking Alexandria, Potomac Yard development and Crystal city. 
It was a quick turnaround. The station panels include line map, a map of the surrounding area, a schedule of frequency, and other information such as fares and connecting bus routes.
Photo by Oran Viriyincy. Designed at CHK America

Our team at CHK America put  together these service information panels for Metroway BRT.  Operated by WMATA, Metroway is Virginia’s first dedicated busway linking Alexandria, Potomac Yard development and Crystal city. 

It was a quick turnaround. The station panels include line map, a map of the surrounding area, a schedule of frequency, and other information such as fares and connecting bus routes.

Photo by Oran Viriyincy. Designed at CHK America

Work in progress on neighborhood maps. This map is a part of lager panel that will show bus connections near light rail stations.
I always start with ArcGIS to compile initial data layers, then I style everything in Illustrator. Major landmarks are used to orient transit users in relation to the two-letter stops. The simple 3D shapes can be quickly put together in either Sketchup or directly in Illustrator using ‘extrude and bevel’ tool. 

Work in progress on neighborhood maps. This map is a part of lager panel that will show bus connections near light rail stations.

I always start with ArcGIS to compile initial data layers, then I style everything in Illustrator. Major landmarks are used to orient transit users in relation to the two-letter stops. The simple 3D shapes can be quickly put together in either Sketchup or directly in Illustrator using ‘extrude and bevel’ tool. 


A Note on the Making of Oklahoma City’s Transit Map
I recently had a pleasure of designing a system map for EMBARK, Oklahoma City’s transit agency. The network is being made both more frequent and more direct to meet a growing demand. Oklahoma City is often compared to Austin, Texas for their effort to re-imagine the state’s biggest city to be less car-depended and more human-scale and user-friendly. I’m proud to be a part of that evolution.
Download EMBARK system map brochure (PDF)
I didn’t want to move away from geographically-accurate representation completely, but rather settle somewhere in between: The map is not quite a GIS-overlay, but neither it is a subway-style diagrammatic map. This hybrid approach had already been deployed  by Kick Map (http://www.kickmap.com/) and CHK America elsewhere (see the map CHK America created for Spokane Transit). I wanted to replicate the simplicity and usability of those maps.
By moving to schematic representation, I was able to show outlying areas that wouldn’t have otherwise fit on the map. This made it easier to follow the lines.
 Oklahoma City’s gridded geography naturally fits that format.
The map’s layout is based on a modular grid. Each module is about 100  points across, which roughly corresponds to the city’s one-mile mega block, which consists of regular-sized blocks bound by arterial roads:

Taking advantage of the existing geography, I started it out with 45 and 90-degree angles, but had to add additional increments to follow the geography more closely:

Because buses do not run on every street, it made sense to only label the transit streets and the streets leading up to them. Rest of geographic features were allowed to “fade away”: 

Finally, icons play a major role in calling out major destinations located along bus routes. Visually unified with the brand style, they  work just as well at small sizes as they do at big sizes:


Download EMBARK system map brochure (PDF)

A Note on the Making of Oklahoma City’s Transit Map

I recently had a pleasure of designing a system map for EMBARK, Oklahoma City’s transit agency. The network is being made both more frequent and more direct to meet a growing demand. Oklahoma City is often compared to Austin, Texas for their effort to re-imagine the state’s biggest city to be less car-depended and more human-scale and user-friendly. I’m proud to be a part of that evolution.

Download EMBARK system map brochure (PDF)

I didn’t want to move away from geographically-accurate representation completely, but rather settle somewhere in between: The map is not quite a GIS-overlay, but neither it is a subway-style diagrammatic map. This hybrid approach had already been deployed  by Kick Map (http://www.kickmap.com/) and CHK America elsewhere (see the map CHK America created for Spokane Transit). I wanted to replicate the simplicity and usability of those maps.

By moving to schematic representation, I was able to show outlying areas that wouldn’t have otherwise fit on the map. This made it easier to follow the lines.

 Oklahoma City’s gridded geography naturally fits that format.

The map’s layout is based on a modular grid. Each module is about 100  points across, which roughly corresponds to the city’s one-mile mega block, which consists of regular-sized blocks bound by arterial roads:




Taking advantage of the existing geography, I started it out with 45 and 90-degree angles, but had to add additional increments to follow the geography more closely:

Because buses do not run on every street, it made sense to only label the transit streets and the streets leading up to them. Rest of geographic features were allowed to “fade away”: 

Finally, icons play a major role in calling out major destinations located along bus routes. Visually unified with the brand style, they  work just as well at small sizes as they do at big sizes:

Download EMBARK system map brochure (PDF)

Working on a little illustration for a local government. Construction crews are in a  process of gutting car-centric thoroughfares to make them more pedestrian and cyclist friendly. Improvements include adding refuge medians, smart signaling, landscaping and better lighting. The rich illustrative style is meant to make technical jargon understandable to general public. The original diagram was not very legible: 

Working on a little illustration for a local government. Construction crews are in a  process of gutting car-centric thoroughfares to make them more pedestrian and cyclist friendly. Improvements include adding refuge medians, smart signaling, landscaping and better lighting. The rich illustrative style is meant to make technical jargon understandable to general public. The original diagram was not very legible: 

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